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Why Does My Vagina Hurt After Sex? 15 Possible Reasons (+ Fixes)

Look: 

Sex should NOT be painful.
But sometimes, you may experience a sore vagina after a mind-blowing session. 

So you may ask yourself: “Why does my vagina hurt after sex?

First things first: If you experience vagina soreness, don’t stress out. 

We’ll explore 15 common causes why your vagina may hurt after sex and possible solutions.

Further Reading:

Why Does My Vagina Hurt After Sex?

Post-sex vaginal pain can occur for many reasons.   

Maybe your hymen broke during sex. 

Maybe it’s from bacterial vaginosis or a long-term condition like an ovarian cyst or vulvodynia.

But breathe easy. 

Here are 15 common causes for a sore vagina (or pelvic pain) after sex and how you can soothe it:

  1. You Didn’t Use Enough Lubrication During Sex
  2. Your Hymen Broke
  3. You’re Not Aroused Enough During Sex
  4. You Have Tight Pelvic Floor Muscles
  5. Your Sex Toy or Partner’s Penis is Hitting Your Cervix
  6. You Had Rough Sex
  7. You Have Allergies
  8. You May Have Low Estrogen Levels
  9. You Have Scar Tissue in Your Vagina
  10. It Could be Your Medication
  11. You Have Vulvar Varicose Veins
  12. You Have a Vaginal Infection
  13. You Suffer from Bladder Inflammation
  14. You May Have a Sexually Transmitted Infection
  15. Other Medical Conditions

1. You Didn’t Use Enough Lubrication During Sex

Here’s the thing: The wetter you are, the better the sex. 

Why?

When you’re not wet enough (lack of lubrication), the friction from sexual intercourse can cause skin tears. These tears can cause vaginal pain and even lead to infection.

The Fix

Get lube

Squeeze out some and apply it to the vagina to soothe the pain.

Ensure the lube is alcohol-free, or you might end up stinging the skin tears (ouch!). 

We recommend: Coconu’s Oil Based Personal Lubricant

It’s alcohol-free, hypoallergenic, and all-natural. Plus, the organic coconut oil moisturizes your dry or sensitive vaginal tissue.

Next time, don’t forget to lube up before penetrative sex. It’ll supplement your vag’s natural lubrication.

2. Your Hymen Broke

First time exploring vaginal penetration?

That could be why you’re experiencing vaginal pain. 

When you have sex for the first time, your hymen can break — it’s a thin tissue covering your vaginal opening. 

How to tell if your hymen broke? 

Usually, you’ll find a little tell-tale blood on the sheets or your underwear. 

The Fix

Treat yourself to a warm bath to reduce the pain from a broken hymen. 

Don’t worry. The pain will eventually disappear. 

Still unsure if your hymen is broken? Visit your gynecologist for verification.

3. You’re Not Aroused Enough During Sex

Sometimes, you’re not as turned on as you’d like. (No biggie.)

But getting down and dirty before you’re fully aroused can mean painful intercourse (dyspareunia), especially if you don’t use lubrication. 

The result?

A sore vagina after intercourse.

The Fix

Ice, ice, baby! 

Grab some from your kitchen, wrap it in a clean cloth, and apply it to your vulva over your underwear. You can also sit or lay on the ice if you like. 

Apply this cold compress for about 10 minutes to soothe any irritation and swelling.

How to feel more aroused in the future?

One word: Foreplay! 

Communicate with your partner and get busy in the pregame department. 

Tell them what gets your motor running. 

Even better?

Introduce a personal lubricant to build excitement and make sex frictionless.

Try Coconu’s Hemp Infused Body Oil. It’s 100% natural and uses USDA-certified organic coconut oil combined with hemp's known benefits to soothe your body.  

You can use it for any sexual activity (before, during, and after a romp). 

 Read More: Try these 8 Seductive Tips to Introduce Lube in the Bedroom.

4. You Have Tight Pelvic Floor Muscles

Imagine your pelvic muscles contracting all the time — that’s what tight pelvic floor muscles do. 

It can make intercourse super uncomfortable. 

What causes tight pelvic muscles?

  • Poor posture
  • Physical activity like cycling
  • A naturally tighter muscle structure in and around your pelvis

The Fix

Heard of reverse kegels?

It’s a simple exercise to help you relax and stretch your pelvic floor muscles. 

To perform reverse kegels:

  • Go to the bathroom first. Make sure your bladder and bowels are empty, or you might have an unfortunate accident.
  • Start with a regular kegel while standing, sitting, or lying down. Clench and release your pelvic floor muscles to make them stronger. (You can identify your pelvic muscles by imagining that you’re trying to stop peeing.)

  • Next, start the reverse kegel: Release the kegel and concentrate on stretching your pelvic muscles. The muscles should feel elongated. At the same time, you should feel your pubic bone and tailbone relaxing, stretching apart.

  • Your vagina and anus will move downwards. Hold the reverse kegel for 5 seconds and release for 5 seconds.

  • Once you get the hang of it, skip the regular kegel at the beginning.

Try to perform three sets of three reverse kegels.

5. Your Sex Toy or Partner’s Penis is Hitting Your Cervix 

Sure, size matters.

But if your dildo or partner’s penis (or hand) is quite big, it may hit your cervix during sexual penetration. 

The constant bumping into the cervix won’t feel great and could bruise your vag, making your  vagina hurt post-sexy-time.

The Fix

Try a warm bath or heating pad. 

You can also use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) like naproxen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, etc. They help reduce inflammation or soreness. 

Then, give your vagina some space and time to heal. 

You should start feeling better in about 30 minutes. If the pain doesn’t let up, call your doctor.

What’s a long-term solution for this issue?

  • Say Yes to More Foreplay: ​​It helps produce natural lubrication and expands the vagina, allowing deeper and more comfortable sexual penetration. As always, add lube for frictionless boinking.

recommending_coconu_lube

  • Try Cowgirl Sex Positions: Consider sex positions where you (the person with the vagina) are in control of the penetration. Three words: Get on top! (Yee-haw!)
  • Say No to Doggy Style: Skip positions that maximize vaginal penetration, like doggy style, or anything that involves your legs hanging in the air.
  • Get a New Dildo: Is your dildo too large? Consider sizing down.

6. You Had Rough Sex

Adding some rumble and tumble to your sexual activity can spice things up.

But it can also create tons of friction and vaginal pain — especially if there isn’t enough lubrication.

The Fix

As we said earlier, if your vaginal opening has soreness or is swollen after sex, apply a cold compress over your underwear for 10-15 minutes.

Wondering if you should shut down hot, rough sex? 

No way, Jose!

All you need is lube, lube, and more lube

And take your sweet time with foreplay, as it’s a great way to warm up your vagina. 

It’s also important to take sex slow — at least when you’re only starting. Then, gradually build up the speed and intensity to avoid sexual pain.

7. You Have Allergies

If you’re allergic to latex and have used a latex condom during intercourse, it may cause vaginal pain. 

Did you know you could also be allergic to lube ingredients or proteins in your partner’s semen? 

This can cause redness, burning, and swelling down there.

The Fix

If you have an allergic reaction only around the vaginal opening, apply some ice over your underwear to soothe the area.  

But if your symptom(s) become severe, contact a doctor ASAP! 

Seek their advice if you suspect latex condom or semen allergies. If latex condoms are the culprit, dump them immediately.

We know what you’re thinking... What can I use instead of latex condoms? 

There are many alternatives, like polyurethane condoms.

As far as a semen allergy goes, using a condom can fix the issue to a great extent.

Think it’s the ingredients in your lube?

Take an allergy test to pinpoint the lube ingredient behind your discomfort. This way, you can avoid lubes with that specific ingredient. 

When in doubt, opt for an all-natural lubricant like Coconu’s Water Based Lube

It contains no harmful chemicals and moisturizes sensitive areas, boosting your natural lubrication and amping up pleasure. 

8. You May Have Low Estrogen Levels

Did you know estrogen maintains your vagina’s lubrication, elasticity, and thickness?

When estrogen levels dip in a woman's body, they can experience thinning, drying, and vaginal wall inflammation. This condition is called vaginal atrophy. 

How do you get vaginal atrophy?

It can be that a woman is going through menopause, is breastfeeding, or taking anti-estrogen drugs. Or, maybe they recently had a baby. 

The Fix

Vaginal moisturizers! Yes, they’re a thing. 

Line the inside of your vagina with the moisturizer, leaving it on for several days. It’ll work its magic and heal the vaginal tissue over time. 

Do you only have vaginal dryness

Lube will work just fine.

Try the Coconu Water Based Lube for an exciting, long-lasting way to slip and slide! 

9. You Have Scar Tissue in Your Vagina

Vaginal scar tissue forms when a vag wound heals after a cut, sore, burn, or another skin issue. 

For example: 

If you’ve recently given birth or had surgery down there, the incision may form scar tissue if it doesn’t heal properly. This can cause deep pain in the vagina.

The Fix

If you don’t have a lot of scar tissue, using a lubricant during sexual intercourse may help ease the pain. 

If that doesn’t work, don’t fret. 

Talk to your doctor. 

They’ll do a physical exam and recommend what to do next. The doctor may even suggest seeing a physical therapist specializing in pelvic issues.

10. It Could be Your Medication

Do you take contraceptive pills?

The Pill can cause vaginal dryness, resulting in a sore vagina after sex.

The same goes for antidepressants you may take for your mental health and well-being.

The Fix

Consult your doctor to find ways to curb this issue and find alternative medications.

11. You Have Vulvar Varicose Veins

Um, what are vulvar varicose veins? 

It’s the swelling of the vagina’s outer lips caused by blood pooling in the veins. These veins can cause discomfort and result in vaginal soreness.

The Fix

Although vulvar varicose veins sound scary, try these handy tips to relieve pain:

  • Apply a cold compress to your vulva.
  • Invest in a support garment designed specifically for vulvar varicosities.
  • Elevate your legs to promote circulation whenever you can.
  • Switch positions and avoid standing or sitting for long durations.

woman_in_distress

12. You Have a Vaginal Infection

Are you experiencing vaginal itching or burning?

Do you bleed during sex?

Have you had any abnormal vaginal discharge? 

If you answer yes to any or all of these questions, you may have a vaginal infection (vaginitis). 

It could be a vaginal yeast infection, bacterial vaginosis, urinary tract infection (UTI), or something else entirely. 

Pro Tip: 

If your vagina hurts after sexual intercourse, there’s a high chance of yeast infection. That’s because vaginal pain is its most common symptom. 

If you have a yeast infection, you may also notice symptoms like: 

  • Vaginal itching
  • Swelling
  • Painful urination

The Fix

Thinking you can self-diagnose and that the infection will go in a few days?
Don’t fall for this idea your sexual health is no joke!

Consult your doctor ASAP. You may need prescription medication, depending on the infection. 

For a vaginal yeast infection, you could treat it with over-the-counter medicines like miconazole.

You should also follow these preventive tips to avoid dreadful vaginal infections:

  • Use a condom. Or a dental dam based on the type of intercourse. They can protect you from STIs.
  • Always pee after sex if you don’t want a urinary tract infection.
  • No matter how strong the urge is, do NOT douche (wash the insides of) your vagina. Your vagina is a genius, self-cleaning device that doesn’t need you interrupting its process or disrupting the pH balance. Got it?

13. You Suffer from Bladder Inflammation

Yes, it sounds scary. 

But bladder inflammation or interstitial cystitis is something many women deal with.
It causes bladder pressure, bladder pain, and sometimes pelvic pain.

You may also feel like hitting the bathroom more often to urinate and experience painful sex (dyspareunia).

The Fix

If you have bladder inflammation, consult your doctor. Depending on the severity, they’ll suggest bladder training, medication, or surgery. 

But, unfortunately, these treatments won’t cure the condition — they only provide some relief.

14. You May Have a Sexually Transmitted Infection

Pop quiz: 

When was the last time you tested for a sexually transmitted infection?

If it’s a fleeting memory, get tested ASAP to rule out the possibility. Take your partner with you if they haven’t been tested to prevent future reinfections.

Why?

Vaginal pain during and after sex may also indicate a sexually transmitted infection (STI) like chlamydia, gonorrhea, or genital herpes. 

The Fix

If you have an STI, your doctor will guide you through the treatment and necessary medication  for your sexual health and well-being. 

If you don’t have an STI, congratulations! 

But a trip to the doctor will rule out other causes and put your mind at ease.

Read More: Want to curb vaginal dryness? Check out these 12 Best Home Remedies to ease discomfort.

15. Other Medical Conditions

Some other medical conditions behind vaginal soreness or painful intercourse include:

  • Endometriosis: This happens when your uterine lining grows outside your uterus — instead of inside it.
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID): If you have pelvic inflammatory disease, sexually transmitted bacteria will spread from your vag to other reproductive organs, causing an infection.
  • Uterine fibroids: These are benign (non-cancerous) growths that can develop in and on your uterus.
  • Ovarian cysts: An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac that can develop in or on an ovary. They’re mostly harmless and go away without treatment. But larger ovarian cysts can cause pelvic pain.
  • Vulvodynia: Ever experienced chronic vaginal pain for at least three months with no clear cause? Then you could have vulvodynia. It can also result in burning, stinging, rawness, and painful sex (dyspareunia).
  • Cervicitis: This condition occurs when your cervix becomes inflamed.
  • Vaginismus: Have your vaginal muscles squeezed or spasmed involuntarily, making penetration painful? You probably have vaginismus.

The Fix

Visit your gynecologist. They’ll run blood tests and perform a physical exam or an ultrasound to spot anything unusual.

What’s next?

Depending on the outcome, your doctor will suggest the best way to minimize vaginal pain during and after sexual intercourse. 

Bonus: Your doctor can also bring excitement back to your sex life by figuring out more comfortable sex positions.

When Should You See a Doctor?

It’s time to go “What’s up, Doc?” if:

  • A deep pain in the vagina persists for more than a day or two
  • You experience intense abdominal pain
  • You have unusual vaginal discharge or bleeding

The early diagnosis will let you get back to having sultry sex — without the dreaded after-party (read: vaginal pain)!

Turn on the Heat With No Vaginal Pain

We can’t stress this enough: 

If your vagina hurts, you shouldn’t have to live with it. Don’t let it mess with your confidence and mental health.

Get to the bottom of the issue, so the only thing that hurts post-sex is your heart (because sexy time is over)

Meanwhile, if you want to up your lube game, try Coconu’s Oil Based Lube. This way, you can say bye-bye to sexual pain and intensify pleasure (as it should be)!